top of page

8 Ukrainian-Owned Businesses We Love in New York City

Updated: Oct 25, 2022



Since the late 1800s, New York City has been home to a vibrant Ukrainian community whose impact and influence is seen throughout the city. The presence of Ukrainian Americans in New York City is perhaps most evident in the Ukrainian Village, a micro-neighborhood located in the East Village.


In the Ukrainian Village and beyond, there are many Ukrainian-owned businesses that we love for their delicious food, excellent selection of clothing and accessories, and high-quality services. Here are eight of our favorites, as recommended by Brown Harris Stevens agents.




Though Ukrainian-owned, Keuka Kafe is a new American restaurant in Forest Hills, Queens recommended to us by Denise de Maria. Owner and chef Oleg (Ollie) Sakhno and his wife Olga have created a cozy space that offers some of the finest domestic and international wines as well as a diverse menu of small and large plates that pairs beautifully with the libations. Enjoy meat and cheese boards, smoked duck breast, and the "Jewel Avenue" sandwich, made with smoked salmon delivered from Brooklyn.



For a truly authentic experience, Victoria Vinokur recommends a visit to Streecha in the East Village. Meaning "meeting" or "gathering," Streecha is a local favorite among Ukrainian Americans in New York. On the menu you'll find borscht, pierogi, stuffed cabbage, goulash, and much more.






Owned by Ukrainian entrepreneur and esthetician Valeriia Laskarides, Honey Scent was recommended to us by Kleopatra Phili. The salon is known for their clean, on-trend brow and eyelash services, including eyelash lifts and their signature "Brow Fix," which enhances and perfects your brows without the use of permanent makeup.





Pamper yourself with "all-day wear" pajamas from Lera Wear. According to Kleopatra Phili, the boutique offers silk and linen pajamas sewn in Ukraine that can easily be dressed up to go out and about, all while enjoying their comfort and flexibility. With Lera Wear, you can truly go to work or school in your jammies.





No list of Ukrainian-owned businesses in New York City is complete without Veselka, recommended by Maria-Stella Fountoulakis, Lori Abeles, and Kimberly Barkoff, Veselka is a New York City institution that has been serving authentic Ukrainian cuisine in the East Village since 1954. The restaurant's pierogies and borscht are among the most popular offerings, and it is not uncommon to see a line of people stretching around the block to get them to go. To help overseas, 100% of Vesleka's borscht sales are being donated through the organization Razom for Ukraine.









Located in the heart of the Ukrainian community in the East Village, Arka has provided a taste of Eastern European culture in Manhattan since 1951. You can find traditional clothing here as well as historical books, folk art, sculptures and paintings, antiques, and much more. Victoria Vinokur recommends Arka for the wonderful gifts you can discover here.













Olga Zoria's recommendation is a go-to for Manhattanites since 1970. Owned by Ukrainian native Julian Baczynsky, the East Village Meat Market offers fresh cold cuts, premium cuts of meat, smoked hams, and signature Eastern European meat products. Their famous smoked sausage is prepared fresh daily. In solidarity with Ukraine, East Village Meat Market is promoting donations to Razom for Ukraine.



Founded by Kharkiv-born Sveta Savchitz, this West Village restaurant recommended by Victoria Vinokur serves up authentic Ukrainian hospitality alongside vereniki, pelmeni, and a selection of other European-inspired flavors.


Brown Harris Stevens stands with Ukrainians and Ukrainian Americans and is proud to have collected $50,000 in support of the International Rescue Committee's emergency assistance of displaced Ukrainians in March 2022. Find out about other organizations you can support here.

Related Posts

See All

1 Comment


Sign up to receive curated listings and market insights straight to your inbox.

Thanks for submitting!

bottom of page